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Seniors Week Post 3- Strength Training As We Age

Seniors Week Post 3- Strength Training As We Age

Can You Put Your Luggage In The Overhead Locker?

Can You Lift Up Your Grandkids?

Can You Hit The Golf Ball As Far as You Want?

Strength Training Benefits

Adequate strength and function is required to complete all of these activities and as we discussed earlier on in the week, our strength is declining as we now have time to enjoy life and have some fun!

Resistance training is our natural remedy to declining strength but unfortunately it isn’t being utilised enough in the majority of older adults who would benefit from it most.

3 Out Of 4 Australians Aged Over 65 Don’t Get Enough Exercise

  • Research shows Gains In Strength Of Up To 100% in people aged 80-100 who start resistance exercise in only 10 weeks!
  • In another study, Increases in muscle cross-sectional area were measured to Increase 13% In 10 Weeks.
  • Compare it with the Inactive Group Who’s Muscle Size Decreased 16% In The Same Timeframe, the difference is staggering.
  • Increasing strength also leads to better coordination, memory, cognition, bone density and decreasing pain levels due to joint problems!
  • Not to mention it’s positive effects on chronic illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
  • So whether you want to drive the ball further in golf or find things a bit easier while travelling, resistance training is a fun and safe way to improve your strength and overall performance.

Things to Remember…..

  • Resistance training improves strength, increases muscle mass and bone density
  • The more intense the exercises are, the better it is for us!
  • No matter your age, resistance training is extremely safe
  • Resistance training doesn’t just positively affect your musculoskeletal system – benefits have even been seen in memory and cognition!

Countless studies have examined the effects of resistance training in older adults and the results are conclusive: it’s extremely safe and it’s awesome for us!

References

Mayer, F., Scharhag-Rosenberger, F., Carlsohn, A., Cassel, M., Müller, S., & Scharhag, J. (2011). The Intensity and Effects of Strength Training in the Elderly. Deutsches Aerzteblatt Online, 108(21), 359–364. https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2011.0359

Fiatarone, M. A., O’Neill, E. F., Doyle, N., Clements, K. M., Roberts, S. B., Kehayias, J. J., … Evans, W. J. (1993). The Boston FICSIT study: the effects of resistance training and nutritional supplementation on physical frailty in the oldest old. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 41(3), 333–337. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8440860

Seguin, R., & Nelson, M. E. (2003). The benefits of strength training for older adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 25(3 Suppl 2), 141–149. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0749-3797(03)00177-6.

Skou Eriksen, C., Garde, E., Linde Reislev, N., Lawaetz Wimmelmann, C., Bieler, T., Kraag Ziegler, A., … Eriksen, C. (n.d.). Physical activity as intervention for age-related loss of muscle mass and function: protocol for a randomised controlled trial (the LISA study). https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016

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